Container Home Build in pictures Part 1

This video shows the progression of the construction of a house using two shipping containers welded together. Total square footage ends up being 640 sq.ft. (container sizes: 8′ x 40′) about the size of a one bedroom apartment.

http://www.ContainerHomeBuild.com shows in greater detail the project progression.

PART 2

building a container home
by zetson

19 thoughts on “Container Home Build in pictures Part 1

  • July 27, 2017 at 7:17 pm
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    If anyone is interested in container home plans the greatest success that I have ever had was with the Magic Container Plans (i found it on google) definately the best course that I have ever tried.

  • July 27, 2017 at 7:42 pm
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    класс!

  • July 27, 2017 at 7:58 pm
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    Remember these containers come from other countries. Wood floors could be treated with insecticides and pesticides to prevent continental transfer of insects and such. Paint could be led based. There are no guidelines or restrictions on their units. Not fit for human occupation. The idea is a good one but could this lead to health problems? list of chemicals used https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4465480/table/Tab1/

  • July 27, 2017 at 8:30 pm
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    1/ used containers should be around $2,000 a piece, not 3-6k that you paid for. 2/ if you don't cut the entire 40' wall down, say cut three openings at 10',12' and 10' wide, hen you don't need to weld a 40' long I-beam on the roof between two containers. This is only if you can draw a floor plan before you cut all the side wall down, and then you put in partitions later any way. This s where you need an architect to draw the floor plan first.

  • July 27, 2017 at 8:58 pm
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    Simple and beautiful !

  • July 27, 2017 at 9:54 pm
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    maestro muy lindo !!!! consulta q altura tienen los container . ??

  • July 27, 2017 at 10:33 pm
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    There are several components to doing a pro job. One resource I found which succeeds in merging these is the Rohon home build (google it if you're interested) without a doubt the most helpful course i've heard of. Check out this amazing site.

  • July 27, 2017 at 11:11 pm
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    very nice, thanks

  • July 28, 2017 at 12:11 am
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    Sounds like the cheesy music you hear when you pick jazz on a kids piano keyboard please go with nothing next time.

  • July 28, 2017 at 12:36 am
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    The I-beam down the center is a nice way to bridge the gap but it will only lay vertical if your containers are matched in side height. There is some variation between container manufacturers. Mismatched container roof joints can be bridged with 2" x 1/8" steel strip (I had half a 4×8 sheared into strip which was cheaper than buying flat bar but YMMV). I tacked then welded the seam with E71T-11 flux core wire in a suitcase wire feeder.

  • July 28, 2017 at 1:22 am
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    Not impressed. Now you have a box with a roof that can take no load. That had best be in an area with no snow, no wind, because both will take it away. that will not meet code anywhere, and you cut out he entire wall, so tell me what is holding up the roof on a 40' span. that beam on top? What is holding up the beam? You need an engineer to look at that and get a proper foundation. So all that work, you have steel walls. So the weather is always temperate? What about insulation? I like the basic idea of using strange materials to build stuff, especially if you have no building skill, but for the $6.000 to $12,000 you spent on the containers, you could have had a monoslab with cement block walls twice that size. Next time get a truss company to build those, they are incredibly cheap compared to what you did, and they will be engineered to take the load. Most importantly, I suggest you get up on the roof and brace those trusses.

  • July 28, 2017 at 2:21 am
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    Sir, what did you put between the conex halves to insure water tight integrity? The top had a stitch welded I beam and the bottom of the ceiling had a rectangular, stitch welded, piece. What happens when it rains?

  • July 28, 2017 at 3:00 am
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    hey ,if anyone else wants to discover cargo container home plans try Corbandy Container Crusher (just google it ) ? Ive heard some great things about it and my partner got amazing results with it.

  • July 28, 2017 at 3:11 am
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    hey how come you didn't shake your booty ? during the construction ,nice job

  • July 28, 2017 at 3:55 am
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    good job. I also think about building a house from containers. Greetings from Poland

  • July 28, 2017 at 4:23 am
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    i see skills and I'm a skilled builder. nice work my friend

  • July 28, 2017 at 4:57 am
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    How did you fasten the window and door frames to the corrugated walls?

  • July 28, 2017 at 5:12 am
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    did you get local permit to place that down??? dont worry ill let them know

  • July 28, 2017 at 5:53 am
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    good job man but so many ways to do this project.  The sky is the limit to what you can do with shipping containers. New or used.

Comments are closed.